2010 President's Report

Photo of Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum groundbreaking.
Ground was broken March 16 for the iconic Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum.


Jillian Granz’s “green dress” design came to life on the red carpet at the 2010 Academy Awards.


The MSU Carbon2Markets program was deemed outstanding for the past five years by one of its international funders, the Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research.


The Spartan football team posted a season record of 11 wins to capture a share of its first Big Ten championship in 20 years.


The MSU Surplus Store and Recycling Center earned the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design—or LEED—gold certification.


MSU ranks in the top 10 for both study abroad participation and international student enrollment.


MSU’s $600 million Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) project achieved an important milestone when it earned what’s known as CD-1, or critical decision 1, approval from the U.S. Department of Energy, allowing work to continue on the preliminary design of the project in fiscal year 2011–12.


MSU’s Terrie Taylor, University Distinguished Professor of internal medicine, was selected to receive a 2011 American Medical Association Foundation Excellence in Medicine Award.

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Michigan State University Milestones 2010

From groundbreaking discoveries that will make a difference in communities near and far to groundbreaking events for facilities that promise to transform the physical, educational, and cultural landscapes of MSU, the year 2010 was filled with epic adventures and myriad achievements—as evidenced by the milestones presented here.

JANUARY

MSU received a $430,000 Rockefeller Foundation grant that will enable MSU researchers to study the impact of climate change on droughtstricken East Africa, providing crop breeders and agricultural specialists with regionally specific climate data to research and manage crops in an effort to improve food production.

In a move that will increase research and training endeavors in China and East Lansing, MSU’s College of Human Medicine signed a medical education agreement with Zhejiang University that encourages faculty collaboration on research projects and grant applications as well as crossinstitution student study.

FEBRUARY

The 2010 Peace Corps rankings placed MSU No. 4 overall among the nation’s large colleges and universities with 86 undergraduate alumni serving in the Peace Corps in 2009. The university has been on the Peace Corps Top Colleges and Universities list since the start of the ranking system in 2001.

MSU launched its Anti-Counterfeiting and Product Protection Program, or A-CAPPP, the nation’s first comprehensive research and training program designed to address what the FBI has called “the crime of the 21st century.” A-CAPPP’s focus is to provide resources to industry and government to help reduce counterfeiting and its impact.

MSU was awarded a $25 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish BEACON —short for Bio/computational Evolution in Action CONsortium—a center for the study of evolution in action in both natural and virtual settings. BEACON , one of five highly coveted NSF Science and Technology Centers, brings together researchers from several MSU colleges and four partner universities.

MARCH

MSU senior Jillian Granz’s “green dress” design came to life on the red carpet at the 2010 Academy Awards after Suzy Amis Cameron, wife of Avatar producer James Cameron, chose Granz as the winner of her sustainable dress design competition. Granz recommended that her no-waste pattern be constructed from peace silk, a fabric that allows silkworms to complete their life cycle.

Ground was broken March 16 for the iconic Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, a 46,000-square-foot facility designed by world-renowned architect Zaha Hadid that will focus on contemporary art. Dedication of the museum, for which the Broads have donated $28 million, is planned for spring 2012.

For the third time in seven years, a team from MSU won the National Debate Tournament. Honors College members Carly Wunderlich, a chemistry senior, and Eric Lanning, an international relations junior, faced a team from Northwestern University in the finals to capture the championship in the 64th annual competition.

MSU announced it is bringing a world-leading social media company to mid-Michigan in a new research and development partnership with IN gage Networks, which develops enterprise social media solutions to help companies, nonprofits, and governments collaborate online. IN gage Networks will occupy space on campus near researchers, facilitating a collaboration that will produce online social media solutions while equipping participants to engage in the global knowledge economy.

APRIL

Research by MSU entomologists that found a bacterium can stop dengue viruses from replicating in mosquitoes was published in the April 1 issue of the journal PLoS Pathogens. Dengue fever—caused by a virus transmitted by mosquitoes—threatens 2.5 billion people yearly, and there is no vaccine or treatment.

On the 10-year anniversary of its 2000 NCAA National Championship game win, the MSU men’s basketball team made its nation-leading sixth Final Four appearance in the past 12 years.

U.S. News & World Report cited five MSU graduate programs as No. 1 in the nation in its 2011 edition of America’s Best Graduate Schools: nuclear physics; elementary education and secondary education, both for the 16th year in a row; industrial and organizational psychology; and rehabilitation counseling.

MAY

MSU announced creation of a specialization in sustainability—the first such program in the country that will use what’s known as a competency-based curriculum. Earning the specialization will provide students with the practical experience needed in an ever-greening world and may increase their postgraduation job prospects.

Spring commencement at MSU showcased what can be done when a university cares about its carbon footprint: nearly 8,000 invitations were e-mailed; diplomas were made from recycled paper; and graduates wore caps and gowns made from 16,500 yards of fabric created using more than 58,500 recycled plastic bottles.

JUNE

MSU moved from 17th to 14th place in the annual list of top places to work in academia compiled by The Scientist. Tenure and promotion and overall job satisfaction at MSU were noted in the international science trade publication readers’ survey.

An unprecedented expedition along the Transamazon Highway by MSU geographer Bob Walker and his research team confirmed the existence of illegal operations that threaten the world’s largest rainforest but also found surprising evidence that many of the Brazilian government’s efforts to protect the environment are working.

JULY

The MSU Carbon2Markets program was deemed outstanding for the past five years by one of its international funders, the Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research. The carbon accounting system focuses on helping some of the world’s poorest people grow trees that will boost their standards of living while helping slow climate change as the trees keep carbon out of the atmosphere by storing it in the soil.

AUGUST

A student business incubator and an entrepreneurship certificate program will help anchor MSU ENet, a new program established to connect university and community resources into an innovation ecosystem for entrepreneurs.

For the third straight year, MSU’s undergraduate program in supply chain management was ranked No. 2 in the country by U.S. News & World Report. The magazine’s most recent Best Colleges edition also recognized three “outstanding programs” at MSU designed to foster student success: study abroad, service-learning, and learning communities.

SEPTEMBER

MSU’s $600 million Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) project achieved an important milestone when it earned what’s known as CD-1, or critical decision 1, approval from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), allowing work to continue on the preliminary design of the project in fiscal year 2011–12. FRIB, a DOE Office of Science National User Facility, will attract top nuclear scientists and engineers from around the world to conduct research to advance understanding of rare isotopes and their applications.

Leaders from MSU and the College of Human Medicine and its partners across Grand Rapids gathered September 10 for a ribbon cutting and dedication of the college’s $90 million, privately funded medical education facility named for MSU alumni Peter and Joan Secchia. The facility in downtown Grand Rapids is the college’s new headquarters.

Work began September 16 on an addition to Wells Hall that will eventually become the university’s language education hub. The project, which will add three stories and create about 88,000 gross square feet of space above the building’s B wing, is expected to be completed in August 2012.

The College of Nursing broke ground September 24 on the new $17.6 million Bott Building for Nursing Education and Research, a move that supports the college’s growth as a national research leader and will help the state address its nursing shortage. The Timothy and Bernadette Marquez Foundation committed $7 million to the building, which will be named in honor of Bernadette’s parents, John and Anna Bott.

OCTOBER

With its University Research Corridor (URC), Michigan has the third fastest research and development growth rate among competitive innovation clusters worldwide, according to the 2010 Empowering Michigan report by Anderson Economic Group. MSU partnerswith the University of Michigan and Wayne State University in the URC —the top U.S. cluster in enrollment and third in awarding high-tech degrees.

Researchers at MSU and four partner institutions will use $28 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development to bolster agricultural education and research systems in Senegal in hopes of increasing food supplies and improving nutrition. The consortium will work with Senegalese universities and training centers as part of the Capacity Building for Agricultural Education and Research project.

NOVEMBER

MSU veterinary pathologist Charles Mackenzie was part of a project that unlocked how the antiparasitic drug ivermectin kills the worms brought on by the filarial diseases river blindness and elephantitis. The research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may lead to new treatments for the diseases, which afflict about 140 million people worldwide.

MSU ranks in the top 10 for both study abroad participation and international student enrollment, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors 2010 annual report. For the sixth year in a row, MSU ranked No. 1 for study abroad participation among public universities; MSU ranks eighth overall in international student enrollment.

The MSU Surplus Store and Recycling Center earned the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design—or LEED—gold certification, the council’s second highest designation. The center contains a number of green features, including rooftop solar panels that produce 10 percent of the building’s electricity.

The Eli Broad College of Business vaulted into the top 20 of American business schools in the latest biennial rankings by Bloomberg Businessweek. In addition, the college’s full-time MBA program ranked 20th overall and seventh among public universities. Student satisfaction was a major factor in the Broad College’s move into the top 20.

DECEMBER

For her years of dedicated work in Africa studying and treating malaria, MSU’s Terrie Taylor, University Distinguished Professor of internal medicine, was selected to receive a 2011 American Medical Association Foundation Excellence in Medicine Award, which recognizes physicians for international work that changes the future of medical care. Taylor’s research team is using a $9.1 million federal grant to create new prevention and control strategies for malaria in Malawi.

The Spartan football team posted a season record of 11 wins to capture a share of its first Big Ten championship in 20 years.